Find Out Which of Your Facebook Friends Likes Stephen Harper
Dec09

Find Out Which of Your Facebook Friends Likes Stephen Harper

Everyone who voted against harper have a great reason to be cheering today. We found a new way to make a Facebook link that allows you to identify which of your friends “likes” the immensely-detested dictator on the social network site. Technology proves yet again to be a grand service to the human race! After sifting through the users who are fans of the most hated Crime Minister in Canadian History, it goes so far as to delete them from your Facebook friend list! Of course, this link does nothing to change the fact that this man has sold...

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Nelson Mandela dies at 95
Dec05

Nelson Mandela dies at 95

Nelson Mandela dies at 95 One of the most beloved leaders of the 20th century, Nelson Mandela died Thursday at the age of 95. Mandela, who inherited a country on the verge of civil war and torn apart by racial violence, will forever be remembered for bringing hope and reconciliation to South Africa. Controversial for much of his life, he ultimately became a beacon of optimism for people both at home and around the world. Nelson Mandela, one of the most beloved leaders of the 20th century, died Thursday at the age of 95. The iconic leader — known for his charismatic personality, soft-yet-stirring speeches and charitable work post-politics — spent 27 years behind bars for opposing white rule in his country before becoming South Africa’s first black president in 1994. Mandela became increasingly frail in recent years and was hospitalized several times in the past few months, receiving treatment for pneumonia, an ongoing lung infection and gallstones. Though he served only five years in office, Mandela is recognized the world over, often seen as someone with great dignity and moral authority. While he sought a quiet family life in retirement, he continued to meet with notable dignitaries and celebrities, weigh in international affairs and conflicts, and champion causes in which he believed, including poverty and HIV/AIDS. At age 85 and amid failing health, he was forced to announce he was “retiring from retirement,” in 2004, retreating from the spotlight as much as possible. His last major public appearance was in 2010, when South Africa hosted the World Cup of Soccer. He was greeted by thunderous applause but made no speech. Known for his unyielding optimism, Mandela leaves behind a lasting legacy — with countless parks, schools and squares named in his honour. His birthday is a public holiday in South Africa, where Mandela is affectionately known by his clan name, Madiba. Mandela’s life behind bars, in power For too long known as a political martyr, Mandela was sentenced to life in prison in the 1960s for trying to overthrow the pro-apartheid government. He served 27 years of hard labour, mostly at Robben Island, looking forward to his only perk — a 30-minute session with a visitor once a year. While in jail, Mandela unified the prisoners, foreshadowing the leadership skills he would use when he became the country’s first fully-representative democratically elected president. His release on Feb. 11, 1990 was brought about in part by heavy economic sanctions imposed on South Africa by dozens of countries, including Canada. As the world watched on television, Mandela walked confidently toward the prison gates, his wife Winnie at his side. A...

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Rob Ford does the splits with Jean-Claude Van Damme
Nov18

Rob Ford does the splits with Jean-Claude Van Damme

Rob Ford does the splits with Jean-Claude Van Damme One’s a disgraced Toronto mayor. The other an aging action star. Together they join forces to take over the web. No, this isn’t some new buddy movie, it’s a twisted mashup of two of last week’s most viral videos. Someone got the bright idea to superimpose Rob Ford’s face onto Jean-Claude Van Damme’s “epic split” ad for Volvo and the result has delighted the...

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Belarus begins confiscating and selling vehicles of drunk drivers
Nov16

Belarus begins confiscating and selling vehicles of drunk drivers

A court in Belarus has confiscated the car of a repeated drunk driver and ordered the person to 1.5 years of community service following the introduction of a new law. The car is now set to be sold. Russia is considering similar legislation. A 28-year-old man became the first offender to experience the strict new laws aimed at combating drunk driving in Belarus. It was his second drunk driving offense in two months. While the car did not belong to the man, the court said that in this case “the ownership of the vehicle is of no legal relevance.” A special commission will set the price for the car, which will then be sold, Interfax-Belarus reported. According to the law, if the offender wishes to keep the car, he or she must re-purchase it. The money from the sales of confiscated vehicles is expected to serve as compensation for victims of traffic accidents. At the end of October, Belarus introduced a new law under which a drunk driver’s vehicle will be confiscated and sold if he or she is detained at least twice during one year. The driver will have his or her driver’s license suspended for three years, face a fine of almost US$1,400, be ordered to 1.5 years of community service, and face monthly earnings retention of 20 percent. Offenders involved in accidents that cause human death will face up to 10 years behind bars. These rules will also be applied to foreign nationals. Since the law came into effect, police have detained 117 offenders who may face the same charges, said Stanislav Solovey, senior inspector of the Interior Ministry of Belarus, according to Russia’s Channel One TV. The new law sent the Belorussian blogosphere into a frenzy, with many questioning its effectiveness. “Will it work? Generally speaking it will not, like any law based only on deterrence…” said user ‘buburu’ on Belarusian online Q&A service qq.by. Meanwhile on Friday, a Russian lawmaker from Russia’s Liberal Democratic Party introduced a bill under which repeated drunk driving will be punished by the confiscation and sale of an offender’s vehicle. The driver’s license will be suspended for three years, but the car will be confiscated only if it is owned by the...

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Wake up and postpone the coffee
Nov16

Wake up and postpone the coffee

Wake up and postpone the coffee HERE’S a word you shouldn’t try to get your head around if you haven’t had your morning coffee yet: chronopharmacology. It is the “the study of the interaction of biological rhythms and drug action”, says Steven Miller, a neuroscience PhD student of Washington DC, and it applies significantly to the flat white or latte most Australians will consume sometime during the morning. It also explains why you shouldn’t have consumed one at 8am. “Drug tolerance is an important subject, especially in the case of caffeine since most of us overuse this drug,” Miller says on his blog. “If you drink caffeine at a time when your cortisol concentration in the blood is at its peak, you probably should not be drinking it.” This is because cortisol production is strongly related to your level of alertness and it just so happens that cortisol peaks for your 24-hour rhythm between 8am and 9am on average. “Therefore, you are drinking caffeine at a time when you are already approaching your maximal level of alertness naturally. One of the key principles of pharmacology is use a drug when it is needed. Otherwise, we can develop tolerance to a drug administered at the same dose.” Miller says the optimal time for caffeine is between 9.30am and 11.30am. On average, he says, blood levels peak again between 12pm and 1pm, and between 5.30pm and 6.30pm. Your coffee will therefore be the most effective if you enjoy it when your cortisol levels are dropping, but before the next spike. If you just can’t wait for your morning caffeine hit, Miller suggests a tip learned from a professor: providing the sun isn’t blindingly bright, drive or walk to work without sunglasses. This will help increase morning cortisol production at a faster rate and make you feel more...

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