30 Things to Stop Doing to Yourself
Nov16

30 Things to Stop Doing to Yourself

Stop spending time with the wrong people. – Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you.  If someone wants you in their life, they’ll make room for you.  You shouldn’t have to fight for a spot.  Never, ever insist yourself to someone who continuously overlooks your worth.  And remember, it’s not the people that stand by your side when you’re at your best, but the ones who stand beside you when you’re at your worst that are your true friends. Stop running from your problems. – Face them head on.  No, it won’t be easy.  There is no person in the world capable of flawlessly handling every punch thrown at them.  We aren’t supposed to be able to instantly solve problems.  That’s not how we’re made.  In fact, we’re made to get upset, sad, hurt, stumble and fall.  Because that’s the whole purpose of living – to face problems, learn, adapt, and solve them over the course of time.  This is what ultimately molds us into the person we become. Stop lying to yourself. – You can lie to anyone else in the world, but you can’t lie to yourself.  Our lives improve only when we take chances, and the first and most difficult chance we can take is to be honest with ourselves.   Stop putting your own needs on the back burner. – The most painful thing is losing yourself in the process of loving someone too much, and forgetting that you are special too.  Yes, help others; but help yourself too.  If there was ever a moment to follow your passion and do something that matters to you, that moment is now. Stop trying to be someone you’re not. – One of the greatest challenges in life is being yourself in a world that’s trying to make you like everyone else.  Someone will always be prettier, someone will always be smarter, someone will always be younger, but they will never be you.  Don’t change so people will like you.  Be yourself and the right people will love the real you. Stop trying to hold onto the past. – You can’t start the next chapter of your life if you keep re-reading your last one. Stop being scared to make a mistake. – Doing something and getting it wrong is at least ten times more productive than doing nothing.  Every success has a trail of failures behind it, and every failure is leading towards success.  You end up regretting the things you did NOT do far more than the things you did. Stop berating yourself for old mistakes. – We...

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Western Black Rhinoceros Actually Declared Extinct In 2011
Nov15

Western Black Rhinoceros Actually Declared Extinct In 2011

The subspecies of the black rhinoceros was given the proclamation two years ago in 2011. Even that status change was in some ways late. The IUCN had enough evidence to declare western black rhinos extinct in 2006, but the conservation group typically waits five years before making a significant change in case of new evidence, Save The Rhino reported. To find the last time western black rhinos were seen in the wild, one has to go even further back to 2003, according to Save The Rhino (other breaking stories list the last sighting as 2006). Those rhinos were confined to a small region of Cameroon and eventually killed by poachers. Poaching was the main reason for their demise and continues to threaten the remaining three subspecies of the black rhino (the eastern black, the south central black, and the southwestern black). Consumers in Asia, mostly Vietnam, covet the rhinos almost exclusively for their horns, which they hold as a symbol of status and believe to be a cure for cancer and hangovers, according to Save The Rhino. “You’ve got to imagine an animal walking around with a gold horn; that’s what you’re looking at, that’s the value and that’s why you need incredibly high security,” Simon Stuart, chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission, told BBC News in 2011 when the organization made its first public announcement of the western black rhinoceros’ extinction. Stuart said 25 percent of all mammals on earth are at risk for extinction, according to the same article. Killing animals like the western black rhinoceros for sport and for their resources has increased by 5,000 percent since 2007, according to One Green Planet. If poaching continues at the same pace, the number of both black and white rhinos are projected to go into decline by 2015-2016 — meaning more rhinos will be killed and die of natural causes (rhinos can live up to 50 years old, according to One Green Planet) than will be born, according to Save The...

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Massive Mako Shark Caught off Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
Nov15

Massive Mako Shark Caught off Yarmouth, Nova Scotia

This mako shark was hooked in the mouth off the coast of wave rich Nova Scotia, fought slightly for fifteen minutes, came up along side of the boat to have a look, which was just long enough for one of the crew to put a rope around it tail. That’s when the shit really hit the fan. The shark took off, towing the 42-foot fishing boat backwards through the water at about 7 knots-just like in the movie Jaws. The boat was taking on water and the shark would jump completely out of the water at times. This went on for an hour before the shark actually drowned. The big guy weighed in at...

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Time lapse map of every nuclear explosion ever on Earth
Nov15

Time lapse map of every nuclear explosion ever on Earth

Japanese artist Isao Hashimoto has created a beautiful, undeniably scary time-lapse map of the 2053 nuclear explosions which have taken place between 1945 and 1998, beginning with the Manhattan Project’s “Trinity” test near Los Alamos and concluding with Pakistan’s nuclear tests in May of 1998. This leaves out North Korea’s two alleged nuclear tests in this past decade (the legitimacy of both of which is not 100% clear). Each nation gets a blip and a flashing dot on the map whenever they detonate a nuclear weapon, with a running tally kept on the top and bottom bars of the screen. Hashimoto, who began the project in 2003, says that he created it with the goal of showing”the fear and folly of nuclear weapons.” It starts really slow — if you want to see real action, skip ahead to 1962 or so — but the buildup becomes...

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What does space sound like?
Nov15

What does space sound like?

What does space sound like? Unlike what you might have heard in sci-fi movies, sound does not travel through a vacuum. How can space have sound? Sound travels in waves just like light or heat does, but unlike in those mediums, sound travels in space by making molecules vibrate. For sound to travel there has to be something with molecules for it to travel through. In space, the ‘sounds’ that are recorded are the electromagnetic vibrations that naturally occur in the vacuum of space. Various space probes have recorded the interactions between the Solar Wind in our Solar System and our own planet, as well as Uranus, Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Recordings have also been made of IO and Miranda, and rings of planets Saturn and Jupiter. The recordings of these interactions come from several different sound environments. The ‘sounds’ of Earth come from the interaction of the Solar Wind with the planet’s magnetosphere, which releases charged ionic particles within the 20-20,000Hz range. Space sounds also come from the magnetosphere itself, and from trapped radio waves bouncing between Earth and the inner surface of its atmosphere. Space sounds also come from electromagnetic field noise within space itself and from charged particle interactions from the planets, their satellites and the solar wind. The sounds also come from charged particle emissions from the rings around planets. You can listen to some of these sounds here. The deepest note in space ever detected is a B♭, detected in sound waves from a supermassive black hole in NGC 1275, in the Perseus cluster of galaxies 250 million light years from Earth. No human can hear the note, as its time period between oscillations is 9.6 million years, and it is 57 octaves below the keys in the middle of a piano. The “note” is the deepest ever detected from any object in our Universe. NASA’s Voyager 1 recently passed the heliosphere and into the interstellar medium. NASA knew the spacecraft had reached this point because of the vibrations of interstellar plasma detected by Voyager’s antennae. The sounds were recorded using an onboard plasma wave instrument, which detected the vibrations of dense interstellar plasma, or ionised gas, from October to November 2012 and April to May 2013. The waves detected by the instrument antennae were simply amplified and played through a speaker. These frequencies are within the range heard by human ears. Listen to the sounds here. The Voyager I & II Spacecraft have sent back recordings from Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. You can listen to​ some more space sounds...

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