The current state of the World.
Aug22

The current state of the World.

No matter what the media has spoon fed you since birth, or what your brainwashed friends tell you, the world has turned into a disgusting shit filled oasis of regurgitated propaganda and modern day slavery. I could go on for hours about the shit the elite does to us and our countries. But it would make for a pretty long post with a lot of reading. and who has time for that shit! Steve Cutts does a great job of bringing the current state of the world to a visual art form, so instead of me trying to type hours worth of text, here is the best way to get the point across… Find more at stevecutts.com, facebook or twitter  ...

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The Radioactive Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals.
Mar19

The Radioactive Guardian of Fukushima’s Animals.

Since the Fukushima disaster in 2011, there have been many stories coming from the area. Mostly stories of the horrid handling of the disaster and truthful conspiracies. Many stories of the hardships have surfaced from the residents of the area, now left homeless. But now we have a happier story in the Fukushima area. During the governments evacuation of the 12 mile zone, thousands and thousands of animals were left stranded and forgotten. With many owners not being allowed back,  the animals were left with no food or water, and many being chained up or locked in houses. 55-year-old Naoto Matsumura, dubbed the Guardian of Fukushima’s animals, wasnt worried by the government exclusion zone. He returned after the evacuation to feed his animals, and realized that many more in the area needed help. He has been returning for 4 years now to feed and tend to the animals left behind. Taking care of a litter of kittens. Some animals can’t tend for themselves. He loves helping the Animals. Food supplies have been running low. Matsumura is the only human brave enough to live in Fukushima’s 12.5-mile exclusion zone Matsumura knows that the radiation is harmful, but he “refuses to worry about it” “They also told me that I wouldn’t get sick for 30 or 40 years. I’ll most likely be dead by then anyway, so I couldn’t care less” All the animals get quite happy when Matsumura comes to visit He also freed many animals that had been left chained up by their owners The government has forbidden him from staying, but that doesn’t stop him either The commute has been rather slow lately. 😀 He started in 2011 and is still going strong 4 years later He relies solely on donations from supporters to work with and feed the animals Matsumura discovered that thousands of cows had died locked in barns His supporters are calling him the ‘guardian of Fukushima’s animals’ Its a big job, But someone has to do it. For Donations. Please go here… (http://ganbarufukushima.blog.fc2.com/)...

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Whale survives harpoon attack 130 years ago to become ‘world’s oldest mammal’
Dec12

Whale survives harpoon attack 130 years ago to become ‘world’s oldest mammal’

A giant bowhead whale caught off the coast of Alaska had a harpoon point embedded in its neck that showed it survived a similar hunt ? more than a century ago. Biologists claim the find helps prove the bowhead is the oldest living mammal on earth. They say the 13-centimetre arrow-shaped fragment dates back to around 1880, meaning the 50-ton whale had been coasting around the freezing arctic waters since Victorian times. 130-year-old weapon: The shiny scars on the weapon are a result of the chain saw cut Because traditional whale hunters never took calves, experts estimate the bowhead was several years old when it was first shot and about 130 when it died last month. “No other finding has been so precise,” said John Bockstoce, a curator at the New Bedford Whaling Museum in Massachusetts. Calculating a bowhead whale’s age can be difficult, and is usually gauged by amino acids in the eye lenses. It is rare to find one that has lived more than a century, but experts now believe the oldest were close to 200 years old. The weapon fragment lodged in a bone between the whale’s neck and shoulder blade comes from a 19th century bomb lance. Bowhead whale: Thought to live up to 200 years but the recent discovery is the best proof yet Fired from a heavy shoulder gun, the harpoon was attached to a small metal cylinder filled with explosives and fitted with a time fuse so it would explode seconds after it was shot into the whale. Experts have pinned down the weapons manufacture to a New England factory in about 1880 and say it was rendered obsolete by a less bulky darting gun a few years later. Even though the device probably exploded, the bowhead was protected by a one foot thick layer of blubber and thick bones it uses to break through ice one foot thick to breathe at the surface. The fragment alongside a similar but unfired bomb lance patented in 1885. “It probably hurt the whale, or annoyed him, but it hit him in a non-lethal place,” said Mr Bockstoce. “He couldn’t have been that bothered if he lived for another 100 years.” The find adds growing weight to evidence that bowheads outlive all other mammals. Six similar harpoon points have been found in the whales since 2001, all suggesting they live much longer than previously thought. The oldest known ages for mammals are 110 years for a blue whale and 114 years for a fin whale. The oldest documented human was a 122-year-old French woman, who died ten years ago. Famous novel: Captain Ahab, leading his...

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Nelson Mandela dies at 95
Dec05

Nelson Mandela dies at 95

Nelson Mandela dies at 95 One of the most beloved leaders of the 20th century, Nelson Mandela died Thursday at the age of 95. Mandela, who inherited a country on the verge of civil war and torn apart by racial violence, will forever be remembered for bringing hope and reconciliation to South Africa. Controversial for much of his life, he ultimately became a beacon of optimism for people both at home and around the world. Nelson Mandela, one of the most beloved leaders of the 20th century, died Thursday at the age of 95. The iconic leader — known for his charismatic personality, soft-yet-stirring speeches and charitable work post-politics — spent 27 years behind bars for opposing white rule in his country before becoming South Africa’s first black president in 1994. Mandela became increasingly frail in recent years and was hospitalized several times in the past few months, receiving treatment for pneumonia, an ongoing lung infection and gallstones. Though he served only five years in office, Mandela is recognized the world over, often seen as someone with great dignity and moral authority. While he sought a quiet family life in retirement, he continued to meet with notable dignitaries and celebrities, weigh in international affairs and conflicts, and champion causes in which he believed, including poverty and HIV/AIDS. At age 85 and amid failing health, he was forced to announce he was “retiring from retirement,” in 2004, retreating from the spotlight as much as possible. His last major public appearance was in 2010, when South Africa hosted the World Cup of Soccer. He was greeted by thunderous applause but made no speech. Known for his unyielding optimism, Mandela leaves behind a lasting legacy — with countless parks, schools and squares named in his honour. His birthday is a public holiday in South Africa, where Mandela is affectionately known by his clan name, Madiba. Mandela’s life behind bars, in power For too long known as a political martyr, Mandela was sentenced to life in prison in the 1960s for trying to overthrow the pro-apartheid government. He served 27 years of hard labour, mostly at Robben Island, looking forward to his only perk — a 30-minute session with a visitor once a year. While in jail, Mandela unified the prisoners, foreshadowing the leadership skills he would use when he became the country’s first fully-representative democratically elected president. His release on Feb. 11, 1990 was brought about in part by heavy economic sanctions imposed on South Africa by dozens of countries, including Canada. As the world watched on television, Mandela walked confidently toward the prison gates, his wife Winnie at his side. A...

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Skydivers Land Safely After Mid Air Plane Crash!
Dec04

Skydivers Land Safely After Mid Air Plane Crash!

When two planes carrying a total of 9 skydivers collided mid air, 12,000 feet above Superior, Wisconsin. The wings disconnected from one of the planes causing a fiery explosion. All 9 skydiver landed safely, as well as the two pilots, one of which was taken to the hospital to treat minor cuts

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