GMOs linked to gluten disorders plaguing 18 million Americans
Nov28

GMOs linked to gluten disorders plaguing 18 million Americans

GMOs linked to gluten disorders plaguing 18 million Americans Genetically modified foods such as soy and corn may be responsible for a number of gluten-related maladies including intestinal disorders now plaguing 18 million Americans, according to a new report released on Tuesday. The report was released by the Institute for Responsible Technology (IRT), and cites authoritative data from the US Department of Agriculture, US Environmental Protection Agency records, medical journal reviews as well as  international research. “Gluten sensitivity can range in severity from mild discomfort, such as gas and bloating, to celiac disease, a serious autoimmune condition that can, if undiagnosed, result in a 4-fold increase in death,” said  Jeffrey M. Smith, executive director of IRT in a statement released on their website. Smith cited how a “possible environmental trigger may be the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) to the American food supply, which occurred in the mid-1990s,” describing the nine GM crops currently on the market. In soy, corn, cotton (oil), canola (oil), sugar from sugar beets, zucchini, yellow squash, Hawaiian papaya, and alfalfa,  “Bt-toxin, glyphosate, and other components of GMOs, are linked to five conditions that may either initiate or exacerbate gluten-related disorders,” according to Smith. It’s the BT-toxin in genetically modified foods which kills insects by “puncturing holes in their cells.” The toxin is present in ‘every kernel’ of Bt-corn and survives human digestion, with a 2012 study confirming that it punctures holes in human cells as well. The GMO-related damage was linked to five different areas: Intestinal permeability, imbalanced gut bacteria, immune activation and allergic response, impaired digestion, and damage to the intestinal wall. The IRT release also indicated that glyphosate, a weed killer sold under the brand name ‘Roundup’ was also found to have a negative effect on intestinal bacteria. GMO crops contain high levels of the toxin at harvest. “Even with minimal exposure, glyphosate can significantly reduce the population of beneficial gut bacteria and promote the overgrowth of harmful strains,” the report found. Dr. Tom O’Bryan, internationally recognized expert on gluten sensitivity and Celiac Disease, says that “the introduction of GMOs is highly suspect as a candidate to explain the rapid rise in gluten-related disorders over the last 17 years.” Internist, Emily Linder, offered some backup for the report’s findings. She removed GMO from her patients’ diets, finding that recovery from intestinal diseases was faster and more complete. “I believe that GMOs in our diet contribute to the rise in gluten-sensitivity in the US population,” Linder said in the...

Read More
Exploding sperm whale
Nov26

Exploding sperm whale

The whale died from natural causes, as it entered too shallow waters and was not able to escape. It was left for two days in the water, so the intestines had started to ferment and rot. This resulted in a pressure buildup, as can be seen in this video.

Read More
11-week-old lion cub is awesome
Nov25

11-week-old lion cub is awesome

Karis is a young lion cub at Scotland’s Blair Drummond Safari Park. Recently, as her keepers were raking leaves to tidy up her enclosure, one of them thought it might be fun to leave a pile for Karis to play in. Karis agreed. Yes, that would be...

Read More
Too many Bong Hits? Take an Ibuprofen!
Nov25

Too many Bong Hits? Take an Ibuprofen!

It can be a bummer or a benefit, depending on your perspective Ibuprofen is great for squashing a headache. Turns out, the pain medication can also block a marijuana high, which can be either a bummer or a benefit depending on your perspective. According to a new study performed on mice by researchers at the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center and published in the Cell journal, chemicals in the over-the-counter painkiller allow the plant’s therapeutic benefits to kick in with no buzz, no memory loss and no loss of motivation. The findings could help provide a way for patients who use marijuana to combat pain but who don’t like to get stoned, find relief. And they could expand other legal treatment options for people suffering from chronic disease. “Our studies have solved the longtime mystery of how marijuana causes neuronal and memory impairments,” one of the study’s authors said in a statement. “The results suggest that the use of medical marijuana could be broadened if patients concurrently take a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen. The ability to harness pot’s medicinal affects while avoiding the high could also potentially lead to more widespread acceptance of the THC-based pharmaceutical Marinol. Marinol is approved by the FDA but its marketing is strictly limited to cancer and HIV/AIDS patients. The drug is criticized in pro-marijuana legalization circles for actually being less effective than the plant itself, while retaining the same side effects. Marijuana has “a not-so-widely known effect: it calms inflammation in the brain — a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s dementia, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease,”  according to the Los Angeles Times. The Times also notes that the drug’s high “can be suppressed by inhibiting the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a complex neurochemical process usually set off by inflammation”— and ibuprofen does the...

Read More
Storm turns lighthouses into Cthulhu.
Nov25

Storm turns lighthouses into Cthulhu.

Hollywood set designers make a career out of creating enchanted towers and mythic-looking castles for big-budget fantasy films. But if you visit one of the Great Lakes in the winter, you can often see those special effects in real life without spending a dime. That’s exactly what photographers Thomas Zakowski and Tom Gill found when the lighthouses at the St. Joseph North Pier on the coast of Lake Michigan froze over. And thankfully, they pulled out their cameras to document nature’s frigid masterpiece. The pair of century-old lighthouses, which stand 10.5 and 17.4 metres tall, are connected by a catwalk that leads to some impressive ice sculptures when battered by winter waves. Known for their spectacular icicles, the lighthouses have become an unlikely winter destination for tourists. And based on the breathtaking images below, we can see...

Read More